If University of Alabama School of Law graduate and Birmingham-native Stephen Boyd has any luck, his resume will grow bit longer this spring

Boyd, who joined Attorney General Jeff Sessions team as the Chief of Staff in Office of Legal Policy at the Department of Justice (DOJ) back in February, was nominated by President Donald Trump on Tuesday to serve as Assistant U.S. Attorney General under Jeff Sessions.

Prior to his time with the DOJ Boyd served as the longtime Chief of Staff to Alabama 2nd District U.S. Representative Martha Roby, a position he assumed when Roby was first sworn into office in January 2011.

U.S. Representative Martha Roby (R-Ala.) today congratulated her former chief of staff Stephen Boyd on his nomination to serve as an Assistant Attorney General of the United States. Boyd served as Roby’s top adviser for more than six years and recently joined Attorney General Jeff Sessions at the Department of Justice. His nomination by President Trump was submitted Tuesday and now awaits confirmation by the Senate.

“There is no one better suited to serve our country in this key role than Stephen Boyd. Stephen possesses a keen intellect, conducts himself with the utmost professionalism and decorum, and he works extremely hard,” Roby said of Boyd’s nomination. “Above all, the primary reason he is so well suited for this important role is this: Stephen Boyd will do the right thing. I join his wife Brecke and his parents Ron and Floranne in celebrating this special achievement.”

Prior to launching Roby’s congressional office, Boyd served as Communications Director for both then-U.S. Senator Sessions and the Senate Committee on the Judiciary.

Alabama U.S. Sen. Richard Shelby echoed Roby’s approval of Trump’s nominee.

“Stephen is well-respected across the state of Alabama and is known for his ability to reach across the aisle and get things done,” said Shelby. “President Trump has made a great pick in nominating someone with Stephen’s level of integrity and character for this esteemed position.”

Boyd currently awaits confirmation by the U.S. Senate.